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Treetops may be in wilderness, but we are surrounded by outstanding restaurants where you can celebrate a special occasion with a fantastic meal!
The Age Good Food Guide 2016 edition agrees. Hot off the press a week ago, it lists four places with prestigious hat ratings within an hour’s drive of Treetops.
The list includes the amazing Brae at Birregurra that has burst into the world’s top 100 restaurants after just a few years. Brae was also named the Regional Restaurant of the Year while owner Dan Hunter was named Chef of the Year.

We can help you make bookings at these places so just let us know.

A la Greque (1 hat) http://www.alagrecque.com.au/ Tel. (03) 5289 6922 Corner of Great Ocean Road and Beach Road, Aireys Inlet, Victoria

A la Greque (1 hat)
http://www.alagrecque.com.au/
Tel. (03) 5289 6922
Corner of Great Ocean Road and Beach Road, Aireys Inlet, Victoria

Chris’s at Beacon point (1 hat) http://chriss.com.au/home.html tel. 03 5237 6411 280 Skenes Creek Rd.,Apollo Bay, 3233

Chris’s at Beacon point (1 hat)
http://chriss.com.au/home.html
tel. 03 5237 6411
280 Skenes Creek Rd.,Apollo Bay, 3233

Gladioli (2 hats) http://gladiolirestaurant.com.au/ tel. (03) 5265 1111 14 High St, Inverleigh VIC 3321

Gladioli (2 hats)
http://gladiolirestaurant.com.au/
tel. (03) 5265 1111
14 High St, Inverleigh VIC 3321

Brae (3 hats also in Michelin Top 100 restaurants in the world) http://braerestaurant.com/ Tel. 03 5236 2226 4285 Cape Otway Rd. Birregurra, Vic.

Brae (3 hats also in Top 100 restaurants in the world)
http://braerestaurant.com/
Tel. 03 5236 2226
4285 Cape Otway Rd. Birregurra, Vic.

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This whale season many people have been enchanted by our whales moving along the Great Ocean Road coast to Warrnambool. Listening to people “ooh” and “ahh” there is no doubt many feel a deep connection.

We can help you download the whale app that shoes you when whales are passing our coast. Grab your binoculars and get ready.
Here’s a story that shows the human animal connection seems to be felt by the whales too.

Michael Fishbach, co-founder of The Great Whale Conservancy (GWC), saved a young humpback whale entangled in local fishing nets off the coast of California.
It took him and friends over an hour to get the net off but at the end the whale surprised and delighted them with a fantastic thank you show.
Go to 6 minutes into the video to see her finally freed and the spectacular thank you show she gives her saviours.

 

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wine-in-black_gluehwein-rezeptIn winter at Treetops one of our favourite activities is making and drinking Glühwein, the famous mulled wine from Germany. Our German rellies make it all during the freezing Christmas season and when out and about at Christmas markets in the little towns they just grab some in a festive mug from the market stalls and get warm in a flash.
Wye River and the Great Ocean Road is still chilly but a few sips of your own Glühwein in front of the wood fire will bring a glow to anyone’s cheeks.
Here’s our very own recipe handed down from not, grandma, but grandpa, as it’s often the men that make it (watch out, they usually add far too much brandy!)

• 2 large lemons (peeled and juiced)
• 2 large oranges (peeled and juiced)
• 1 orange not peeled sliced into 5 slices
• 5 whole cloves / 2 whole star anise
• 5 green cardamom pods
• 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
• 3 (3-inch) cinnamon sticks (extra cinnamon sticks for each glass later)
• 2 bottles dry red wine, such as Cabernet Sauvignon or Shiraz (medium quality and price)
• 1/2 cup brandy

gluhweinCarefully remove the skin from the lemons and oranges in pieces and pop into a large pot. Add the juice of the lemons and oranges to the pot. Add orange slices. Add cloves, star anise and cardamom.

Add the sugar, and cinnamon sticks, the red wine and brandy, stir to combine, and bring just to a simmer. Don’t let it boil. Simmer for about 15 mins. Remove all the floating spices with a slotted spoon or small sieve, remove from the heat. Pop a cinnamon stick into each glass and enjoy – PROSIT or SKOL!

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Over the last four weeks we had many guests bringing their best four legged friends to our dog friendly Treetops. And it’s been a crisp winter so no surprises that one of the main activities liked by all is sleeping in front of the wood fire. But kudos to those that romped on the beach and even in the water.
Sam June 2015

Frank and Dexter July 2015

Eski and Mojo July 2015

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Usually our resident koalas hang out in trees but here George is actually walking with us up the forest path. Very cute.

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A very moody winter sky over the Otways Forest treeline. (Photo Sibylle Noras.)

A very moody winter sky over the Otways Forest treeline. (Photo Sibylle Noras.)

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whale-tailA few days ago we saw our first whales for the season, just a kilometre past Wye River on the way to Apollo Bay. Eight cars parked by the side of the road and lots of excited people gave it away. We stood and watched in the freezing wind as the whale, about 200m off shore swam and tail kicked her way towards the next bluff.

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Endangered Hooded Plovers getting protection along Wye River and Separation Creek beaches. Photo G. Ehmke, Shorebirds.

 

There’s a plucky little bird we’ve watched over the years on our Wye River and Separation Creek seashore. They nest on the beaches and we see them regularly defending their nests from people and dogs with shrieking and flapping of wings.

It’s the Hooded Plover which is extinct in NSW and in Queensland. Only 400 remain in Victoria, many along our wonderful part of the Great Ocean Road.

 

Protecting cute little endangered Hooded Plover chicks on Wye River and Separation Creek beaches. Photo GORCC.

We always encourage our guests at Treetops not to take their dogs to that part of the beach (immediately opposite the General Store Café) so that these endangered little guys have a chance to rear their chicks. Our dog visitors have plenty of other areas on the beach to have fun.

Great Ocean Road Coast Committee (GORCC)has just won an award for protecting these birds long the coast – well done folks. Committee teams fence off breeding areas and install signs along the coast informing visitors about these endangered birds. With this sort of care we hope the little birds have a good future here in our coastal villages.

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Whales are coming to Wye River for 2012 season. Unfortunately this is not our photo, the one we saw today was about 250m offshore and a bit far for the poor old mobile phone camera.

Today we saw our second whale for 2012 season at Artillery Rocks which is just a few km away from Wye River. We’ll be watching out for them from now on throughout the next few months.

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